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1955 - Jungle Medical Clinic in Shell

HCJB opened this clinic in 1955. A local Gospel Missionary Union seminary provided chaplains.
HCJB opened this clinic in Shell in 1955. Students from the nearby Gospel Missionary Union seminary served as chaplains.
The Shell medical team gives vaccinations at a remote jungle community.
The Shell medical team gives vaccinations at a remote jungle community.
Dr. Ev Fuller attempts to vaccinate chief Tsantiacu (note the bending needle). Tsantiacu was from the Achuar tribe known for shrinking heads. Tsantiacu became a follower of Jesus.
Dr. Ev Fuller attempts to vaccinate Chief Tsantiacu (note the bending needle). Tsantiacu was from the Achuar tribe known for shrinking heads. But then he learned about Jesus and Tsantiacu would choose to follow Him.

Shortly after Dr. Ev Fuller arrived in Quito in 1950, he met Mission Aviation Fellowship pilot Nate Saint. Nate told him about the incredible medical needs of the people living in the Ecuadorian rain forest. It was then that Dr. Fuller knew God was leading him to begin a medical ministry to the people of Ecuador's Amazon Region. 

For the first few years, Dr. Fuller and Dr. Roberts alternated in taking medical caravan trips where they flew to mission stations and communities in the region. But the need was much greater.  

In 1953, the mission approved a plan to build a mission hospital in Shell. Dr. Fuller had responsibilities in Quito, so he would travel down to Shell every chance he could get.

They began building a small clinic in 1954 at the site of the future hospital. Local missionaries like Nate Saint helped with construction of the clinic, and Jim Elliot did the electrical wiring.  Dr. Fuller and his family moved to Shell that December, and the clinic opened a few months later.

The clinic’s small size presented obvious challenges. A nearby hotel was used as a makeshift hospital ward for recovering surgical patients, or those needing extended or overnight care.  A local taxi functioned as an ambulance—providing transportation between the clinic and the hotel.

Students from the neighboring Gospel Missionary Union Seminary served as chaplains, sharing God’s Word and praying with families who gathered at the clinic.

 

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